Better Homes and Garden Radio


Jean Robb

Volunteer your remarketable gifts and become more marketable!

Volunteer and Market Yourself…Remarkably

“Remarkable Marketable Mehelps you share your remarkable gifts volunteering, making you more marketable along the way.



By Jean Robb

I didn’t have the best childhood. We didn’t have much, so if you needed something you had to find a way to get it. I started working at 11 years old selling candy door to door. I know very scary right, but at 11 years old all I knew was I had to sell a certain amount of candy before I could go home. When I knocked on a door, out came my foot and I didn’t move it until you bought a box of candy. The skills I learned from my difficult childhood, (my lemons) really became a blessing (my lemonade).

I learned at a really young age that persistence will open many doors. As an adult I have walked out on a stage with a tiger after Zig Ziglar and talked to over 2,000 people about overcoming their fears. I know you must be thinking…a tiger? I have volunteered for over 15 years with big cat sanctuaries and have learned you can do something you really love while helping others in remarkable ways. In today’s economy you hear lots of people say they can’t find a job. So what happens?

The longer you’re out of work, you start to lose your contacts. You’re not keeping up with the day-to-day changes in your trade. You’re simply out of the loop. The longer you’re in this position the more the fear sets in. What if I can’t find a job? I have so much to offer, how do I get someone to talk to me? Well as you can see, fear can really take a hold of you, it makes you feel like a deer in the headlights. How do you overcome these things?

First off, STOP listening to the FEAR and STOP making EXCUSES. Look, I’ve made many of the same excuses when I’ve let fear be a part of my life. I now realize that the answer to overcoming the fear is to replace it with remarkable things you can be proud of. Instead of asking why would anyone want to hire me, ask yourself why not me?

After volunteering you could say. Look at the change I’ve made in the lives of others. Look what I’ve learned along the way. Look at the skills I’ve been taught while helping others. Look at the great people I’ve met. They’ve seen first hand the type of passion I put into any job I take on. So how will this work? I have made a commitment to bring you a volunteering opportunity at least once a week. The process of volunteering can be more complicated than people may think.

Email me your news. I have included in each story all the information I received and the direct contacts to make it really easy for you to get your foot in the door.Network, Network, Network” See how you can use that experience to build your resume. Most of all how did you feel about helping others today.

My goal is to get you to share with all of us your experience. Think about how much we can learn from each other. Please email me your pictures and story to remarkablemarketableme@gmail.com so I can post them each day. I will add the trademarks, video and links for you.


Jean Robb is a real estate agent in the Dallas – Fort Worth area who is committed to promoting the importance of volunteering for your community.We have the infrastructure in place with the best real estate team in North Texas, and the process for you and I, together can “give back” to those in need without costing you an extra dime. It’s a win/win for both of us. When you contact me, just mention this page and I'll donate 5% of my commission to any non-profit you want to help!

After reading the above information ask yourself “why would I choose any other realtor”?

Click on the logo located on the sidebar for the story you have an interest in reading.

Each story is interactive. Just scroll over and click on the links in the story to get all the information you'll need for that non profit. Some links will appear as a blank spot in the story. Just scroll over it to activate the link.

Please scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page to see how you can follow by email and see the most popular stories.

I make my living as a Realtor. It allows me the opportunity to stay involved with so many charities. If you're in need of a great Realtor please go to http://www.jeanrobb.com

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Gigi. Grace Charities Helping kid, Animals and the world around her!



  





Giavanna Valderrama loves to help others. She has many charities that she cares about but two of them are at the top of the list Beads Of Courage and Ronald McDonald House. She also has a kids radio station call Gigi Grace . Please look below to see some of the fun stuff Gigi does to help others. She hopes you want to get involved and help someone in need.
Please share your stories with Gigi.
You can leave a comment below!

Making flower arrangements and selling them can be a fun way to earn money to help others!

Beads of Courage~ One nurse has touched the lives of thousands of sick kids through a simple but powerful idea.

         
http://www.beadsofcourage.org
Click on the above link to see the beads of courage main page


Beads of Hope

One nurse has touched the lives of thousands of sick kids through a simple but powerful idea.
Jean Baruch, a pediatric oncology nurse, was good at hanging IV bags and checking vital signs, but she had a harder time helping her young patients deal with the emotional effects of having cancer. "I wanted to encourage them to express their pain and fear, but I didn't know how," she says. "It was very frustrating." She discovered a solution while working at one of Paul Newman's Hole in the Wall Gang summer camps. The camp, which hosts children and families coping with cancer and other
serious illnesses, gave Baruch unique insight into how kids play. She
noticed that campers of all ages love beading. They spend hours making
necklaces and bracelets, then trade or share them with friends and family. "The kids wear the beads for days at a time, even in the shower," she notes. "It seems to make them feel good." Hoping that beads could cheer up young cancer patients in hospitals the same way they do at camp, Baruch founded Beads of Courage in 2004. Children who participate in the program receive colored beads that represent milestones, procedures, and acts of bravery. For instance, they get a yellow bead for an overnight hospital stay, a white one for chemotherapy, and a glow-in-the-dark bead for radiation treatment. It's not uncommon for children to amass 10, 20 -- even 35 -- feet of beads. It helps young patients track and celebrate their progress, but it also gives them a way to get through upcoming procedures, says Gwendolyn Possinger, the coordinator of Children's Memorial Hospital's Beads of Courage program in Chicago. "A child facing another needle can look at his beads and realize that he made it through before so he can do it again," she says. Today the nonprofit organization supports more than 10,000 children in 60 hospitals in the United States, Japan, New Zealand, and Ireland and is funded exclusively by private donations. With the help of participating hospitals, Beads of Courage is also constantly evolving. Baruch and her team have expanded the program to include many conditions and diseases. They also focus on other ways the arts can help families dealing with a serious illness.
The program has been invaluable to children like 9-year-old Rena Miller, of Chicago, who underwent treatment for leukemia that included frequent spinal taps and chemotherapy. When she was rushed to the hospital at midnight a few years ago, she had one consolation: She would get two beads for bravely enduring her hospitalization. The new beads joined hundreds of others on 10 long strands that represent her three-plus-year fight to beat cancer. "Rena reads her beads like a book," says her mother, Danya Miller. "She presents them with pride: 'This is when I first learned how to swallow pills,' for instance. It's a simple but powerful way to remember our journey." Jean Baruch, a pediatric oncology nurse, was good at hanging IV bags and checking vital signs, but she had a harder time helping her young patients deal with the emotional effects of having cancer. "I wanted to encourage them to express their pain and fear, but I didn't know how," she says. "It was very frustrating." She discovered a solution while working at one of Paul Newman's Hole in the Wall Gang summer camps. The camp, which hosts children and families coping with cancer and other serious illnesses, gave Baruch unique insight into how kids play. She noticed that campers of all ages love beading. They spend hours making necklaces and bracelets, then trade or share them with friends and family. "The kids wear the beads for days at a time, even in the shower," she notes. "It seems to make them feel good." Hoping that beads could cheer up young cancer patients in hospitals the same way they do at camp, Baruch founded Beads of Courage in 2004. Children who participate in the program receive colored beads that represent milestones, procedures, and acts of bravery. For instance, they get a yellow bead for an overnight hospital stay, a white one for chemotherapy, and a glow-in-the-dark bead for radiation treatment. It's not uncommon for children to amass 10, 20 -- even 35 -- feet of beads. It helps young patients track and celebrate their progress, but it also gives them a way to get through upcoming procedures, says Gwendolyn Possinger, the coordinator of Children's Memorial Hospital's Beads of Courage program in Chicago. "A child facing another needle can look at his beads and realize that he made it through before so he can do it again," she says. Today the nonprofit organization supports more than 10,000 children in 60 hospitals in the United States, Japan, New Zealand, and Ireland and is funded exclusively by private donations. With the help of participating hospitals, Beads of Courage is also constantly evolving. Baruch and her team have expanded the program to include many conditions and diseases. They also focus on other ways the arts can help families dealing with a serious illness. The program has been invaluable to children like 9-year-old Rena Miller, of Chicago, who underwent treatment for leukemia that included frequent spinal taps and chemotherapy. When she was rushed to the hospital at midnight a few years ago, she had one consolation: She would get two beads for bravely enduring her hospitalization. The new beads joined hundreds of others on 10 long strands that represent her three-plus-year fight to beat cancer. "Rena reads her beads like a book," says her mother, Danya Miller. "She presents them with pride: 'This is when I first learned how to swallow pills,' for instance. It's a simple but powerful way to remember our journey."



The Beads of Courage® Program

ainsley

our main program defined

Every bead tells a story of strength, honor and hope.

What is the Beads of Courage Program?

The Program is a resilience-based intervention designed to support and strengthen children and families coping with serious illness. Through the program children tell their story using colorful beads as meaningful symbols of courage that commemorate milestones they have achieved along their unique treatment path.

how it works

Upon enrollment each child is given the Beads of Courage bead color guide with a detachable membership card. Their Beads of Courage journey begins when each child is first given a length of string and beads that spell out their first name. Then, colorful beads, each representing a different treatment milestone are given to the child by their professional health care provider to add to their Beads of Courage collection throughout their treatment as determined by the Beads of Courage Bead Guide (available from Beads of Courage, Inc.)

The Beads of Courage® Program is available for the following:
  • Cancer and Blood Disorders
  • Cardiac Conditions
  • Burn injuries
  • Just launched in November 2010: Neonatal ICU Families
  • Coming in Summer 2011: Beads of Courage for children coping with a chronic illness.
All Program bead guides were developed in collaboration with experts in the field (nurses, doctors, child life specialists and social workers) so that each bead guide would reflect meaningful acknowledgment of a child's treatment journey. 

major benefits

Ongoing evaluation of the Beads of Courage program indicates that the program helps to decrease illness-related distress, increase the use of positive coping strategies, helps children find meaning in illness, and restore sense of self in children coping with serious illness. The program also provides something tangible the child can use to tell about their experience during treatment and after.

tools training support

Beads of Courage, Inc. provides all hospitals the necessary program materials accompanied by education, training and support to implement the Beads of Courage Program.
  • On-site training for staff that covers research and the science behind psychosocial interventions
  • Procedure and alphabet bead collections
  • Handmade one-of-a-kind treatment milestone beads
  • Program literature (training manuals, membership bead guides and more)
  • Ongoing support for the staff during the longevity of the program

sponsorship

Beads of Courage, Inc. believes strongly in collaborating with local non-profits, local businesses and private donors to provide the Beads of Courage Program at their community hospital. The Program Sponsor or Donor supports the program financially. Beads of Courage will seek sponsorship of your program if desired. If you are interested in learning more about how to become a Program Sponsor, please contact Colin, csmith@beadsofcourage.org.

contact

If interested in the Beads of Courage Program please contact our Program Director
Colin Smith, RN csmith@beadsofcourage.org 










creative courage journal

Journal and trading cards

a way to express

Creative outlet for children coping with the traumatic effects of a serious illness. 

Creative Courage Journal Program Includes a colorful, interactive journal with writing and art activities that help the child to reflect upon their accomplishments while providing a distraction from related treatments and procedures. The journal is accompanied by 25 unique beads that are distributed with their own trading card, and referred to in the journal as the bead collection. 

Referring clinicians will also be given a selection of handmade, one-of-a-kind glass beads to honor and acknowledge every CCJ participant during their treatment journey. These Act of Courage beads are donated to Beads of Courage by artists from around the world. There are special pages in the CCJ where each Act of Courage bead can be documented and described by your child during their treatment. 

Includes:
  • Journal
  • 25 Trading Cards
  • 25 Unique Beads
contact

If your organization is interested in sponsoring Creative Courage Journals for children coping with serious illness in the Beads of Courage Program please contact:
Liz McPeak

Beads of Courage thanks the generous support received to date from Kiwanis and State Farm Insurance in supporting children with serious illness through the Beads of Courage Creative Courage Journal Program.



Glass

Beads of Courage programs depend on donations of all kinds of handmade beads. Thank you for your donations!

Guidelines for Glass Beads:

  • Do not use reduction glass, frits, powders or enamels that leave a metallic surface on the beads.
  • Any size or shape is acceptable.
  • Preferred hole size is 3/32" and larger (1/16" holes are accepted).
  • The inside of the bead should be free of bead release.
  • No sharp corners, sharp edges on the bead holes, cracks or protrusions that would easily break off, including hearts with long, delicate tails.
  • Beads must be fully kiln annealed.
  • Please remember that these beads are worn and handled by children and should be sturdy enough to stand up to wear and tear. 
  • How to Donate Beads
    Mail donations to:
    Beads of Courage 10501 E. Seven Generations Way Suite 161 Tucson, AZ 85747
    Print and fill out bead donation form and send with your beads. 
    Please do not send or directly deliver your beads to member hospitals. All beads must be inspected, logged and packaged at Beads of Courage headquarters.Your beads are important to us. Please be sure to package securely!
    How Glass Art Beads are Used
    Act of Courage Beads
    Handmade glass beads are used as Act of Courage beads. Children choose from this selection to acknowledge special milestones, a particularly rough time or for instances not on the regular bead guide.
    Heart Beads
    Red Heart beads are used in our cardiac program.
    Direct questions to Robert Simmons, Director of Bead Donations rsimmons@beadsofcourage.org
    Polymer Clay 

    Guidelines for Polymer Clay Beads

  • Any size or shape is acceptable.
  • We like bright colors!
  • Preferred hole size is 3/32�
  • No sharp corners or edges or, cracks or protrusions that would easily break off.
  • Please remember that these beads are worn and handled by children and should be sturdy enough to stand up to wear and tear.
  • Print and fill out bead donation form and send with your beads. 
  • Please do not send or directly deliver your beads to member hospitals. All beads must be inspected, logged and packaged at Beads of Courage headquarters.

How to Donate Beads

Mail donations to:
Beads of Courage 10501 E. Seven Generations Way Suite 161 Tucson, AZ 85747
Please do not send or directly deliver your beads to member hospitals. All beads must be inspected, logged and packaged at Beads of Courage headquarters.
Your beads are important to us. Please be sure to package securely!
How Polymer Art Beads are Used:
Polymer beads are featured beads in three of our main programs:
Polymer beads are also very popular at our fundraisers and events where participants create their own art-in-medicine inspired pieces.
Direct questions to arts@beadsofcourage.org

Other Beads

Manufactured Beads
Beads of any color and shape are greatly appreciated. Beads of Courage utilizes all donated manufactured beads in our four Arts-in-Medicine Workshops:
Warrior Figures
Honoring Boxes
Dream Intention Flags
Strength Bracelets.
In addition, manufactured beads are used in finished pieces that are sold or auctioned at our fundraisers.
Please mail donations to:
Beads of Courage 10501 E. Seven Generations Way Suite 161 Tucson, AZ 85747
Direct questions to arts@beadsofcourage.org
 

Please Help Support the Work of Ronald McDonald House Charities











http://rmhc.org/
 Click on the link above to see the 
       Ronald McDonald House main page   


        

The Charity

Ronald McDonald House charities help families get the treatment they need for their seriously hurt or injured children. There are many of them around the world helping families’ everyday. At the Ronald McDonald House there are family centers only steps away from intense care units where many services are available. These services include: Special suites with children with suppressed immune systems, education programs, activities, support services, a kitchen, showers, sleeping rooms, laundry facilities, internet access, books, television, a quiet room, and playrooms for children. There are 128 Family rooms in 15 countries and regions. These rooms are great because it has been proven that when family is close by children heal faster and this give the family to communicate with the doctor’s easily. Another part of the Ronald McDonald House Charities is the Care Mobile. Around 48,000 children of America were treated there in year 2007.Services in the Care Mobile include: Immunizations, dental care, oral hygiene education, asthma treatment, vision and hearing screening, school, sport physicals, prenatal care, nutrition counseling, pediatric care, mental health assessment, and care for special needs children. About 100,000 children receive clinical services on a Ronald McDonald Care Mobile each year. These wonderful faculties are made possible by volunteers and donors. Because of this families are asked to make a $5-$25 donation per day in return. But, no families are turned away, so if it is not possible to pay, the fee is waived.    

Who Are We
We know that families are stronger when they are together, and their presence helps a sick child heal faster and cope better.
While Ronald McDonald House Charities cannot make medicine taste better or take away painful treatments, we can help lessen the burden and ensure more than 4 million families a year have the stability and resources they need to keep their child healthy and happy. For more than 35 years, our approach has been to think globally but act locally by tailoring our programs to address the most urgent needs of each community we serve. With a network of local Chapters, our core programs can be found in 52 countries and regions around the globe:
Ronald McDonald House
Ronald McDonald Family Room
Ronald McDonald Care Mobile
Local Chapters at Work
Grants
RMHC U.S. Scholarships




How You Can Help

You can help Ronald McDonald House Charities and ensure seriously ill or injured children and their families are getting the care and comfort they need.
  • Make an individual or corporate donation
  • Volunteer at a Ronald McDonald House or Family Room
  • Sponsor charity events and activities
  • Hold a company fundraiser
  • Donate toys, food or other household products
However you choose to contribute, your support will benefit thousands of families every day.


  Toy Donations

You can donate new toys, books and games to any Ronald McDonald House playroom.  Because Ronald McDonald Houses serve so many children and families, we can only accept new toys – playroom items get more use than toys played with at home.
Toys that make great donations to a Ronald McDonald House include:
  • Board games
  • Stuffed animals and dolls
  • Books for various reading levels
  • Puzzles
  • Video games (rated E)
  • Movies (rated G)
  • Balls and outdoor games                 

    Donate Food


    Each Ronald McDonald House provides visiting families with at least one stocked kitchen.  Canned goods and nonperishable food items make great donations for any Ronald McDonald House, and they make it easy for families to fix meals and snacks without worrying about grocery shopping.
    Contact your local House to arrange donations.      




RMH Wish List


Donating any of these items, as new, can help Houses better serve families:
  • Paper products (facial tissue, toilet paper, paper towels)
  • Trash bags
  • Aluminum foil, plastic wrap and sandwich bags
  • Laundry detergent and fabric softener
  • Cleaning products (sponges, dishwashing liquid, dishwasher detergent)
  • Bath and bedroom items (towels, shower curtains, sheets and pillow cases)
  • Personal care products (deodorant, dental floss, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, conditioner)
  • Entertainment products (games, movies, books, art supplies)
  • Phone cards
  • Gift cards for local grocery stores and gas stations
  • Greeting cards and postage stamps
Contact your local Ronald McDonald House directly to find out what items are on your House’s wish list.






Contacts


Ronald McDonald House Charities
One Kroc Drive
Oak Brook, IL  60523
Phone:  630-623-7048
Fax:  630-623-7488
www.rmhc.org


We’re always happy to answer any questions you might have. If you can’t find your question answered under the programs below, contact us.
 

1 comment:

  1. Gia you have such a kind heart Bless you in all you do!
    Love Nanny

    ReplyDelete