Better Homes and Garden Radio


Jean Robb

Volunteer your remarketable gifts and become more marketable!

Volunteer and Market Yourself…Remarkably

“Remarkable Marketable Mehelps you share your remarkable gifts volunteering, making you more marketable along the way.



By Jean Robb

I didn’t have the best childhood. We didn’t have much, so if you needed something you had to find a way to get it. I started working at 11 years old selling candy door to door. I know very scary right, but at 11 years old all I knew was I had to sell a certain amount of candy before I could go home. When I knocked on a door, out came my foot and I didn’t move it until you bought a box of candy. The skills I learned from my difficult childhood, (my lemons) really became a blessing (my lemonade).

I learned at a really young age that persistence will open many doors. As an adult I have walked out on a stage with a tiger after Zig Ziglar and talked to over 2,000 people about overcoming their fears. I know you must be thinking…a tiger? I have volunteered for over 15 years with big cat sanctuaries and have learned you can do something you really love while helping others in remarkable ways. In today’s economy you hear lots of people say they can’t find a job. So what happens?

The longer you’re out of work, you start to lose your contacts. You’re not keeping up with the day-to-day changes in your trade. You’re simply out of the loop. The longer you’re in this position the more the fear sets in. What if I can’t find a job? I have so much to offer, how do I get someone to talk to me? Well as you can see, fear can really take a hold of you, it makes you feel like a deer in the headlights. How do you overcome these things?

First off, STOP listening to the FEAR and STOP making EXCUSES. Look, I’ve made many of the same excuses when I’ve let fear be a part of my life. I now realize that the answer to overcoming the fear is to replace it with remarkable things you can be proud of. Instead of asking why would anyone want to hire me, ask yourself why not me?

After volunteering you could say. Look at the change I’ve made in the lives of others. Look what I’ve learned along the way. Look at the skills I’ve been taught while helping others. Look at the great people I’ve met. They’ve seen first hand the type of passion I put into any job I take on. So how will this work? I have made a commitment to bring you a volunteering opportunity at least once a week. The process of volunteering can be more complicated than people may think.

Email me your news. I have included in each story all the information I received and the direct contacts to make it really easy for you to get your foot in the door.Network, Network, Network” See how you can use that experience to build your resume. Most of all how did you feel about helping others today.

My goal is to get you to share with all of us your experience. Think about how much we can learn from each other. Please email me your pictures and story to remarkablemarketableme@gmail.com so I can post them each day. I will add the trademarks, video and links for you.


Jean Robb is a real estate agent in the Dallas – Fort Worth area who is committed to promoting the importance of volunteering for your community.We have the infrastructure in place with the best real estate team in North Texas, and the process for you and I, together can “give back” to those in need without costing you an extra dime. It’s a win/win for both of us. When you contact me, just mention this page and I'll donate 5% of my commission to any non-profit you want to help!

After reading the above information ask yourself “why would I choose any other realtor”?

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Each story is interactive. Just scroll over and click on the links in the story to get all the information you'll need for that non profit. Some links will appear as a blank spot in the story. Just scroll over it to activate the link.

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I make my living as a Realtor. It allows me the opportunity to stay involved with so many charities. If you're in need of a great Realtor please go to http://www.jeanrobb.com

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Ape Action Africa is committed to ape conservation in Africa ~ Shufai's story



http://www.apeactionafrica.org/what-we-do
Click on  link to see the APE Action Africa main page!

Shufai my little adopted APE!
Hi Jean Robb here. After doing the two stories on APE Action African my heart told me to adopt Shufai. APE Action Africa has over 320 primates in our care, including 110 chimps and 20 gorillas, and they all need food, shelter and medicines. Chimps and gorillas can live for 40/50 years so we have a long term commitment to them.….and you can help us take care of them by adopting one of our orphans and becoming involved in their lives with regular updates, watching them grow into their new family groups.

For £30 or $50 per year, less than 60p a week or $1 a week, you can get directly involved in conservation and make a difference where it counts. You can give the great apes a future. 


This little APE really touched my heart. The video above is Shufai's story. 

Shufai

Shufai’s life almost ended in infancy when he narrowly escaped fatal injury from the bullets that killed his mother. After months of intensive care and rehabilitation, Shufai was looking forward to a future amongst a group of other orphaned gorillas when he was struck down by meningitis and almost lost his life a second time. After a remarkable recovery he is now slowly recovering his movement and abilities, as well as his position amongst his young social group. Watch the early days of his recovery here.

If you would like to adopt Shufai then complete our online adoption form and we'll do the rest!





Gorillas: the bad news, the good news and what you can do


Shufai
"Shufai", 6-year-old male, photo by Ian Bickerstaff, Ape Action Africa
These beautiful animals are under threat.  We all know about climate change, deforestation and habitat loss, but it may surprise you to know that gorillas are still being hunted and eaten: gorilla meat is regarded as a delicacy by many.
Where once it may have been subsistence hunting to feed families, nowadays the trade is not limited to Africa, and is driven by wealthy patrons worldwide who are prepared to pay ridiculous sums for gorilla meat.
Gorilla
"Nona", 8-year-old female, photo by Caroline McLaney, Ape Action Africa
But this week the focus should be on celebrating the life of Dian Fossey, who did so much to conserve these magnificent animals, and to bring an appreciation of their plight to so many of us.
The good news is things are slowly starting to change, and in Uganda and Rwanda, gorillas are seen as an iconic species and locals are working to protect them.  At Ape Action Africa, our dream is for Cameroonians to love their gorillas, and that one day, it will be socially unacceptable to eat them.
FSC logo
FSC: The Mark of Responsible Forestry
What Can I Do: Hunting gorillas and chimps is illegal so the meat isn’t openly seen in restaurants or markets, it’s an underground trade.  But there are ways you can help:  logging is a major issue in Cameroon and as loggers build roads deeper and deeper into the forests, the forests (and the gorillas themselves) are opened up to poachers.  So be careful about the source of wood products and look for the FSC label (shown) when you buy, which ensures the wood you are buying is only from forests which are managed in an environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable manner.


How about adopting Nora





Nona’s story: a young gorilla saved


The video is shocking.  Out of a squalid hut, a man is carrying a tiny, dark-skinned baby.  The baby is completely naked and is so distressed its little body is rigid and it doesn’t make a sound.  Its eyes are open but it’s completely non-responsive.  I’m not even sure if it’s alive.  I can barely watch – and then suddenly I realise the “baby” is not human, but a tiny gorilla.  And it is alive!She’s a little girl – Nona – and she was only around 2 months old when her mother was killed by poachers for meat.  Clinging to her mother as baby gorillas do, Nona was shot through the hand when her mother was shot, and was discarded by the hunters and left for dead - too little meat on her tiny body for them to be interested.  At the time she was rescued, she had been left for days without food or water.  But Nona was one of the lucky ones: many baby gorillas in this situation would have been sold into the illegal pet trade. She was discovered by the manager of a logging concession and Ape Action Africa were called in to help, and the video was recorded during her rescue.Ape Action Africa’s Director, Rachel Hogan was there at her rescue, and from that point forward, Nona was cared for by either Rachel and the other staff at the facility 24 hours a day for the next few months.  Here, a delicate balance is required: gorilla babies need the care and attention a human baby does but for Nona to grow up as a healthy gorilla adult, it’s vitally important to minimise her time with humans. Luckily for Nona, another infant gorilla arrived just after Nona, a little boy called Yeba.  Nona was introduced to Yeba, and they soon bonded and started to play like little gorillas should.After many months of round-the-clock care, Nona fully recovered from her injuries and her traumatic start in life. She now enjoys her days with other gorillas in Mefou Primate Park in Cameroon, in the care of Ape Action Africa and their team of 40 staff.  Ape Action Africa’s facilities are in the forest so it’s a wonderfully rich and natural environment for the apes.  Nona now lives in a huge enclosure with 10 other gorillas: as natural an environment as possible.  The gorillas sleep in satellite cages so the staff know they’re ok (and to stop them destroying the enclosure’s plants making night nests!) but after they’re fed in the morning, they literally disappear into their own private forest for the day and only come back for food in the evening!This series of pictures show Nona’s growth from that distraught abandoned infant to a happy, healthy adolescent with a cheeky and confident personality.  She is now 8 years old.
(You can watch the video Nona’s story here)
Nona injured hand
Nona in the early days - her injured hand was where she was shot by the poachers, photo by Ape Action Africa, details below
Nona and Yeba
Nona and Yeba have become fast friends and now play together as young gorillas should, photo by Caroline McLaney, details below
Nona happy and healthy
Nona happy and healthy, photo by Caroline McLaney, details below
Nona
Nona today, photo by Ian Bickerstaff, details below
FSC logo
FSC: The Mark of Responsible Forestry
What Can I Do: Hunting of gorillas and chimps is largely for the illegal bushmeat trade.  The meat isn’t openly seen in restaurants or markets, it’s an underground trade.  But there are ways you can help: logging is a major issue in Cameroon and as loggers build roads deeper and deeper into the forests, the forests (and the gorillas themselves) are opened up to poachers.  So be careful about the source of wood products and look for the FSC label (shown) when you buy, which ensures the products you are buying is only from forests which are managed in an environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable manner.
Caroline McLaney
Chief Executive, Ape Action Africa


Ape Action Africa 
Ape Action Africa is committed to ape conservation in Africa – protecting Cameroon’s great apes through direct action, including rescuing orphaned gorillas, chimpanzees and monkeys, giving them a safe forest sanctuary home where they can live with their own kind.
Photos are from Ape Action Africa, taken at their project in Cameroon
and are used with their kind permission

2 comments:

  1. Dorith Jensen DenmarkJune 16, 2012 at 6:43 PM

    I have adopted both Shufai and Nona and the next one will be Yeba. I'm educated as Bachelor in Nature and Culture dissemination (2006 - 2009) where most of my projects was about bushmeat and pet trade in Cameroon and the consequence of the trade, to make awareness in my class about this problem, in the hope that they would tell others about it.I have talked with a Danish zookeeper who has worked as volunteer in Mefou National Park in 2005 and he said as I also discovered that most people in Denmark don't think and don't care what happens to apes and primates in Cameroon (Africa). I have join something call Ploink where you can donate small amount of money (max £10) a time. I donate 2-3 times a months when I have a little bit of extra money to use. Look at http://www.ploink.co.uk/ if you have a little bit of money you want to donate to Ape Action Africa.:-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Dorith
    You sound like such a kind and caring person. Thank you for sharing your story with me and encouraging others to help the Ape's
    Be Blessed
    Jean Robb

    ReplyDelete